Best Muscle Cars

Muscle Car Prices: [Then And Now]

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Everything seems to go up in price, but we don’t always know by exactly how much.

A great article by 247wallst.com outlines how some of the most popular vehicles in America have changed in price over the years.
Many of the cars in the articles list vehicles from our European cousins, so we will ignore those and stick with the obviously much better American offerings!
It at least makes for interesting reading.

Corvette
Make: Chevrolet
1980-2014 price difference (non-inflation adj.): $39,301
1980 price: $14,694
2014 price: $53,995

Since its introduction to the American market in 1953, the Corvette, made by GM (NYSE: GM) has been continuously produced and sold every year without interruption. While the Corvette has kept its name and much of its styling over the course of 62 years, much has also changed. The original sports car came with 150 horsepower, less than a third of the 460 horsepower of the 2014 Corvette. The vehicle’s price has also changed dramatically. A new 1980 Corvette cost nearly $15,000 in 1980, while in 2014 the price tag was nearly $54,000 — a 267% increase.

Challenger
Make: Dodge
1980-2014 price difference (non-inflation adj.): $20,988
1980 price: $6,502
2014 price: $27,490

Introduced in 1969, the Challenger was taken out of production after just five years on the market. Reintroduced in 1978, the second generation Challenger was not quite the muscle car its predecessor had been. The new Challenger, made by Fiat Chrysler (NYSE: FCAU) was a less powerful coupe that had a price tag of $6,502 in 1980. Dodge halted production of the Challenger again in 1983. However, in 2008, Dodge brought the Challenger back — once again as a muscle car. In 2014, a new Challenger cost $27,490, nearly $21,000 more than it did 34 years earlier.

Impala
Make: Chevrolet
1980-2014 price difference (non-inflation adj.): $20,417
1980 price: $7,253
2014 price: $27,670

Introduced to American motorists in 1957, the Impala has gone in and out of production multiple times since. Chevy halted production of the full-size sedan in 1985 and again in 1996. The car was reintroduced to the market in 1999 and has remained in production ever since. Over the decades, the price of the car has gone up significantly. Costing just $7,253 in 1980, a new Impala had a price tag of $27,670 in 2014. Out of the vehicles that were in production in both 1980 and 2014, the Impala is one of the most popular. Chevy sold more than 140,000 Impalas last year.

Camaro
Make: Chevrolet
1980-2014 price difference (non-inflation adj.): $18,111
1980 price: $6,439
2014 price: $24,550

A new base model Camaro was equipped with 155 horsepower in 1980 and had a price tag of $6,439. Last year, the Camaro was in its fifth generation, with a list price of $24,550. When it was first introduced in 1966, the the muscle car was Chevrolet’s answer to Ford’s Mustang. The Camaro has come a long way since — Chevy sold more than 80,000 Camaros in each of the last two years, making it even more popular than its rival.

Mustang
Make: Ford
1980-2014 price difference (non-inflation adj.): $17,688
1980 price: $5,647
2014 price: $23,335

Ford’s iconic muscle car cost $17,688 more last year than it did 35 years ago, a 313% increase. While the cost of the Mustang has gone up over the years, sales have slowed. When it was first introduced to the U.S. market in 1964, Ford sold a remarkable 126,538 Mustangs. In 2013 and 2014, the American auto manufacturer was only able to sell 77,186 and 82,635 Mustangs, respectively.

Malibu
Make: Chevrolet
1980-2014 price difference (non-inflation adj.): $16,841
1980 price: $6,324
2014 price: $23,165

Since the Chevy Malibu made its debut in 1964, the vehicle has gone through many changes as well as a hiatus. Initially, the car was available as a muscle car, strikingly different from the comfortable mid-size sedan it is today. Chevy halted production of the car in 1983, only to bring it back over a decade later in 1997. In 1980, a new Malibu came with a sticker price of $6,324, 266% less than its 2014 price tag of $23,165. Since its reintroduction to the market, the Malibu has found its niche as a favorite among rental car services. Chevy sold 188,500 units last year.

http://247wallst.com/special-report/2015/08/03/iconic-car-prices-then-and-now/2/



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